THE PAVILION ANNEX

General discussions of interest to readers and fans of Harlan Ellison.

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Ezra Lb. » Fri Jun 10, 2011 11:28 am

Steve Evil wrote:One can never get enough Harlan of course,

BUT, I gotta wonder. . .

How was I supposed to know the "h" was silent?


The mispronunciations of foreign words don't bother me nearly as much as the incoherent phrases like "I could care less". But... the one that drives me absolutely, well...bugfuck (and I can hardly make myself write it) is saying

begs the question when you mean raises the question!

Begging the question is one of the classical logical fallacies, assuming the point of your question is true in the way you put the question. "When did you stop beating your wife?"

If any of you out there do this then stop it right now!
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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FrankChurch
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby FrankChurch » Fri Jun 10, 2011 1:48 pm

Harlan loves to be agitated. Happiness is a warm gun.

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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Moderator » Fri Jun 10, 2011 5:49 pm

I just today noted that one of the people in my office uses the phrase "alls I know".

It's amazing how quickly that becomes annoying.

I'm amused by the people who mispronounce "pronunciation".
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby paul » Sat Jun 11, 2011 6:34 am

Paul's Pet Peeve # 39: Those who put the 'R' in 'Washington'. Even me own mudder, who lived there for years, could not stop pronouncing it "Warshington."
Makes my teeth itch.
~~~~~~~~~

Steve, when I hear people say 'pro-noun-ciation', I always say, "No, IT isn't." :?
The medium is the message.

Anthony Ravenscroft
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Anthony Ravenscroft » Sat Jun 11, 2011 9:23 am

As much as I dislike people who wallow in their own filth & even wear it as a badge of honor, our culture does not in any way teach logicak thinking, much less the possibility of paradigmatic shift. Everything is "just the way it is."

In my family, less than one-fourth of the women get their driver's license. This includes my mom, sister, niece, & sister-in-law -- if I were bleeding profusely, I don't know I'd trust 'em to get me to the hospital as I'm pretty certain none of 'em has been behind the wheel since highschool. They're not stupid, in fact they're all creative people & great problem-solvers. But they're stuck, & dead set on staying stuck.

I'm the only musician in the extended family; my grandma had perfect pitch & could score the school band, & she inspired me to try. My niece & I are the only ones who sketch, much less paint. So when I hear "I wish I could play/draw like that," I say "Give me two hours -- it ain't tough to get started," the conversation never goes further.

Acquaintances (online & IRL) often exclaim, "I'd do anything to have a good job!!" I say stuff like, "Well, sell your house & move 50 miles away -- they're hiring for your experience, at twice what you used to get, & here's the link." An optimistic 9 times of 10, they'll trot out the litany: "I was born in this town! This is my home!" "It wouldn't be fair to the kids!" "How would I spend time with my family??" "We've been coal miners for five generations!!" I'll stop there as it's depressing to recall more excuses. But I get them from a family that's down to one shaky income, their house in foreclosure (& maybe months behind in payments); they'd rather "stand pat" & clap for Tinkerbell than invest their shrinking savings in a low-risk/high-payoff gamble.

Similarly, there's the ones who have to have a huge new SUV every few years "because it's safer & we have children." Never mind they also use it to commute 40 miles to their $8/hour no-benefits job.

I don't believe it's just my family, or this region, rather a culture that remains in willful ignorance of the advantage of planning for the future. As a mass, we've been taught the "nobility" of swimming in s**t; somehow we lionize those who rise above it yet also put down those who have "pretentions." The very party that derides "the nanny state" is packed with people who DEPEND on unflinching handouts, who demand to see taxes (which they don't pay) cut so that corporations will offer jobs (that they won't even apply for so long as the trough remains).

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FrankChurch
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby FrankChurch » Sat Jun 11, 2011 2:51 pm

You don't want me driving you, I'm a horrible driver. I get real nervous behind the wheel. I'd advise you to ask Rain Man to drive.

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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Moderator » Sun Jun 12, 2011 10:43 am

My father, who is never short of solid, useful advice (no sarcasm there, he's really good) once noted to me that there are two kinds of cars you can own: one which is nimble enough to avoid getting hit, the other a vehicle big enough to take the hit and protect you.

A month ago my nimble sports car was stopped in traffic and rear-ended by a vehicle big enough to take the hit.

Dad never discussed that scenario.

But as far as wallowing, I'll fall back on an old adage: "Lead, follow or get the Hell out of our way."
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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FrankChurch
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby FrankChurch » Sun Jun 12, 2011 2:13 pm

Mamet does Rush:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OaFEFTdnClg

Pill poppers--what would his Rabbi say about that?

The founders were regular guys? They were fucking intellectuals! lol.

Milton Friedman? I know four hundred people who could take apart Friedman, albeit alive. Just as Chomsky took apart Buckley.

diane bartels
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby diane bartels » Mon Jun 13, 2011 5:12 am

Hi peeps. How r u all? I am ok. Waiting for blood test results to see if I have lupus. That would explain rather a lot. Have speech at 11 so cannot linger long. Just wanted to touch base with the Webderlanders. Good for Harlan huh? Sometimes that first hurdle is the hardest. Kafka it will come when the time is ready. I know its hard to wait, believe me I know. But it will happen. Hey any writers or acting types, our young friend could use some tips on those two things and breaking into the creative fields and how to stave off discouragment.

Me I just tell my RIC doc and he makes my therapist whip me back into shape. A painful but effective way of dealing with discouragement and depression. Im kidding in case you all didnt pick up on that. My rehab doc is kind gentle and sweet.(kay Dr. S. stop hitting me know. Oww)

Too early in Chicago, hate being up this early.

reddragon70
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby reddragon70 » Tue Jun 14, 2011 5:07 am

Today I watched a BBC documentary presented by Sir Terry Pratchett about assisted suicide. Its called Terry Pratchett : Choosing To Die.

I have to say it was one of the most moving and thought provoking things I have seen on TV for a very long time. For me it made me challenge my own perceptions of suicide. The people presented were not cowards who chose an easy way out, very much the opposite in fact. They were good people, with a level of bravery and courage I doubt I could muster in an entire lifetime. They chose the end of their life due to severe illness. Incurable disease that in this country would mean a steady decline in their quality of life, leaving them unable to enjoy pleasures you and I take for granted.

It was very sad, seeing a lovely gentleman, and I mean that in the sense of a true English gent, suffering from motor neuron disease. Unable to even stand up from a chair to shake a hand. And perhaps worse was the young man aged 42 who is crippled with MS, hearing him tell how he falls out of his bed and has to crawl on his belly to another room in his home. These things that have robbed good people of the joy of simply being alive.

At the end, perhaps saddest and most moving of all, was the assisted suicide of the older gent. He died peacefully. With great dignity, his wife holding his hand throughout. What better way could there be for anyone to leave this mortal coil than to be loved, cared for and above all allowed to retain you dignity.

I know this is a deeply immotive subject and one that many of you here will have strong feelings about. But I for one support it 100% and will always do. I believe in the right of the individual to choose not only how he lives but also how he dies. It is simple self determination. No-one, not even governments, lawmakers or theologians have the right to take that away. It must be the right of the individual to choose.

I also read today that Sir Terry is considering this option. He suffers from a rare form of early onset Alzheimers disease. With the passing of time, and its happening now, his mind will slowly dwindle and erode until the great writer and thinker that he is will cease to be. I hope that when the time comes, should he decide to follow this path, that he will go peacefully and the way that he chooses. I will miss him greatly and I am sure many here will too. However, I would never take his choice from him, and will support his decision with my own dying breath.

I hope that the program is available in the USA via BBCiPlayer or satelite channels. I strongly urge you to watch it.

All the best

Iain

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Steve Evil
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Steve Evil » Tue Jun 14, 2011 3:01 pm

The path is not for me. But I begrudge no one the power to leave on their own terms.

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FrankChurch
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby FrankChurch » Tue Jun 14, 2011 5:15 pm

You're Path-etic. lol

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FinderDoug
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby FinderDoug » Tue Jun 14, 2011 5:54 pm

I begrudge no one the power to leave on their own terms.


I think everyone has a right to the dignity of choosing their own time in such a situation. If you tell me I may live six months or six years, sure - I'll fight. If you tell me I have six weeks if I'm lucky, and the last three will be the most miserable, painful days a man has ever faced? I think I should have the right to choose.

Then again, in the US, "choice" is a matter for obesity supplements from dollar menus, not for human dignity and self-determination.

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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby Moderator » Wed Jun 15, 2011 6:03 am

Diane
How long does it take to get the results, and what can be done if you have Lupus?
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

David Silver
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Re: THE PAVILION ANNEX

Postby David Silver » Wed Jun 15, 2011 4:18 pm

Barber wrote:How long does it take to get the results, and what can be done if you have Lupus?


Steve, lupus is a poorly understood immune system disorder that may express itself differently and to different degrees in different people (predominantly younger women, and a greater percentage of blacks and Asians), and it is also spectral in nature so that a person may only experience relatively minor annoying symptoms, or extremely debilitating life threatening symptoms, or anything in between. It is often VERY difficult to positively diagnose because there is no definitive test, and usually it is diagnosed from the presence of several symptoms for which the possibility of other causative disorders have been dismissed. The most common overt symptoms are similar to rheumatoid arthritis, with the usual addition of significant antibody and white cell shifts in the blood, along with possible sores in various unpleasant places, kidney problems, and even significant emotional shifts including bouts of depression and dementia. You can see, without the availability of a specific test, the symptoms can all be explained by other better understood and treatable disorders. More often than not, the final diagnosis is made by a rheumatologist because there is so much involved with joint pain and inflammation, and the similarity to rheumatoid arthritis where the body is essentially attacking itself. There is no cure. Lupus can only be managed. That means having a good regular working relationship with a doctor who can help monitor the changing degree of the symptoms, improving one's diet and overall fitness, and having the understanding of friends and family that you are effectively crippled by the disease at times, so in need of occasional help. Stress is a killer, known to trigger major flare-ups. Although many people with lupus can have long periods of nearly symptom free life during which they feel they are absolutely normal, lupus remains a lifelong curse that can knock you down unexpectedly at any time. People can live full productive lives after a diagnosis of lupus, but they must NEVER let down their guard and assume the disease is gone. Lupus is a crap shoot. Lupus is a bitch!
We don't stop playing because we grow old.
We grow old because we stop playing.

-- George Bernard Shaw


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