Robert Nason's Culture Café

General discussions of interest to readers and fans of Harlan Ellison.

Moderator: Moderator

User avatar
Moderator
Site Admin
Posts: 10607
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:17 pm
Contact:

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Moderator » Tue Oct 21, 2014 9:43 pm

Absolutely.

I'm done with the derailing, Frank. Here and on other threads.

Don't bother acknowledging, just stop.

Back on topic. Chuck, you care to lead off?
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

User avatar
Chuck Messer
Posts: 2089
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 9:15 pm
Location: Lakewood, Colorado

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Chuck Messer » Tue Oct 21, 2014 10:20 pm

Lead off? My brain has been reduced to pudding. I feel like one of the living dead.

Okay, how's this? We're coming up on Halloween and we've already had the annual Zombie Crawl over here.

The Living Dead: just how much do you think can be squeezed out of this old idea? TV series, movies, public events, even birthday parties. Is it time to bury this thing or is there still life in the old corpse?

Chuck
Some people are wedded to their ideology the way nuns are wed to God.

Douglas Harrison
Posts: 1036
Joined: Thu Jul 10, 2003 12:26 am

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Douglas Harrison » Wed Oct 22, 2014 1:52 am

Archetypal monsters wax and wane. Arroooooo!

(Sorry, Chuck, I'm beat too.)

D.

User avatar
Steve Barber
Posts: 294
Joined: Mon Feb 22, 2010 8:02 am
Contact:

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Steve Barber » Wed Oct 22, 2014 7:18 am

Chuck -
I think the dead have come close to running their course (pun undeniable). There's a resonance about them in the modern world, particularly one as paranoid and self-obsessed as our current culture.

But, as with vampires and werewolves (Buffy and the Twilight series) before them, the public will move on to something new.
All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

Mark Tiedemann
Posts: 2575
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2011 1:51 pm

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Mark Tiedemann » Wed Oct 22, 2014 7:48 am

Steve Barber wrote:Chuck -
I think the dead have come close to running their course (pun undeniable). There's a resonance about them in the modern world, particularly one as paranoid and self-obsessed as our current culture.

But, as with vampires and werewolves (Buffy and the Twilight series) before them, the public will move on to something new.


One can only hope. Please...

User avatar
Steve Evil
Posts: 3519
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2004 3:22 pm
Location: Some Cave in Kanata
Contact:

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Steve Evil » Wed Oct 22, 2014 8:48 am

The Zombie Apocalypse genre is basically the NRA's version of the Cosy Catastrophe. The armed will inherit the world. . .

(I do think the original Dawn of the Dead was quite clever. Let's assume we survive the apocalypse, find a safe haven, and can take freely from all the fruits of consumer culture. . .then what?)

User avatar
FrankChurch
Posts: 16283
Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 2:19 pm

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby FrankChurch » Wed Oct 22, 2014 11:34 am

That's why Day of the Dead was not so good. It wasn't about as much, just guts and blood.

User avatar
Lori Koonce
Posts: 3538
Joined: Sat Jun 23, 2007 12:10 pm
Location: San Francisco California
Contact:

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Lori Koonce » Thu Oct 23, 2014 9:31 am

As long as we have a fear mongering government, we'll have zombies.


George Ramero used them as a trope in all his zombie movies. Remember the scene where the little girl zombie used a garden trowel to eat her mother's stomach? That was a perfect metaphor for how the youth culture was changing in ways that most people didn't understand. I don't watch The Walking Dead but I'd bet my last dollar they do the same thing.

User avatar
FrankChurch
Posts: 16283
Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 2:19 pm

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby FrankChurch » Thu Oct 23, 2014 12:41 pm

That's what she gets for making her eat her veggies.

Mark Tiedemann
Posts: 2575
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2011 1:51 pm

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Mark Tiedemann » Mon Oct 27, 2014 12:18 pm

http://marktiedemann.com/wordpress/?p=2357

I'm putting this here because it's a culture thing.

User avatar
Ezra Lb.
Posts: 4547
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:02 am
Location: Washington, DC

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Ezra Lb. » Mon Oct 27, 2014 8:41 pm

Mark Tiedemann wrote:http://marktiedemann.com/wordpress/?p=2357

I'm putting this here because it's a culture thing.


Yeah very disturbing. I would hope it could be chalked up to a bunch of fourteen year old males whose courage has been bolstered by internet anonymity by who knows? Our popular culture is so infantile. I have to confess that the pleasures of gaming are totally opaque to me. I played Space Invaders for about twenty minutes over at friend's house way back when and that did it for me.

I'm beginning to suspect the Internet will not be the unalloyed joy that was promised. :(
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Tony Rabig
Posts: 230
Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 4:44 pm
Location: Parsons, KS

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Tony Rabig » Sat Nov 01, 2014 8:00 am

Robert,

That's a nice piece on Budd Schulberg in the new issue of Commentary. Haven't read his fiction in a long time (though I'd re-visited The Four Seasons of Success not too long ago) -- may have to go back for another look soon.

Bests,
--tr
--tr

User avatar
Robert Nason
Posts: 1580
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:50 am
Location: New York City

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Robert Nason » Mon Nov 03, 2014 9:59 pm

I want to thank all you guys and gals for the warm words about my humble piece in the Wall Street Journal. And Frank, I assume you're joking when you say I injected my politics into the article. True, Abbott and Costello and the Frankenstein monster, Dracula, and the Wolfe Man were all notorious right-wingers, and Aaron Slick From Punkin' Crick is only remembered today because Aaaron Slick was a friendly witness before the House Committee on Un-American Activities. (Joking, just joking.) But Citizen Kane? Casablanca? The first is a full-throated attack on a character who rather closely resembles that infamous FDR-hater, William Randolph Hearst, and the second stars Bogie as a man who ran guns for the left during the Spanish Civil War and who rejoins the fight against fascisms after temporarily being disullusioned with life following Ingrid Bergman's Dear John letter (which he reads in the pouring rain, so the drops causing the ink to run looks like they could be Bogie's tears). What else? Oh, Tokyo Story, a film about how it's a crime that old people are neglected in modern society. Anyway, I suspect Leonard Maltin is a moderate liberal in his politics, but that's just a guess. I've never met the man, but I'm sure lunch with him would be a lot of fun.

Lori, if I start a 21st century Algonquin Round Table, it won't be in the Algonquin's Hotel's restaurant. Those prices are much too high for common folks like me!

Steve and Douglas and Mark, thank you, thank you, thank you. You're too kind, but I like it. For the record, my blood pressure goes up and down like the Dow Jones Average. (And like the Dow, it's usually high these days.)

I'm happy to hear that Harlan has looked Death in the face and told him to stick it where the moon don't shine. We need Harlan around for a long time to come. The world's becoming a scarier and scarier place, and I derive some comfort knowing that Harlan's here to fight the good fights.

Like Mark, I'm not entirely comfortable blowing my own horn, but I do have a piece in this month's Commentary on novelist and screenwriter Budd Schulberg. You can read it here: http://www.commentarymagazine.com/artic ... -budd-run/ And this time I did inject some political views into the article, but given the man's life, it was impossible not to.

I'm wondering if it would be too gauche too mention the piece in the Pavilion. I'm sure that Harlan doesn't like Commentary OR the Wall Street Journal, but he likes Maltin's Movie Guide and I'm sure he dug Schulberg's novel What Makes Sammy Run? and the films he wrote, On the Waterfront and A Face in the Crowd. But I doubt he approves of Schulberg's cooperating with HUAC. Still, he might like to know that he's partly responsible for unleashing me on the world. His kind words really motivated me to sit down and write and send the stuff out. He might not agree with all my views, but I think he'd respect my honesty and devotion to the craft. What do you folks think?
"Thought is a strenuous art -- few practice it, and then only at rare times." - David Ben-Gurion

User avatar
Robert Nason
Posts: 1580
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:50 am
Location: New York City

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Robert Nason » Tue Nov 04, 2014 2:21 am

Tony, I'm glad you enjoyed the Schulberg piece. If you're going to reread The Four Seasons of Success, I'd recommend you look at the revised and expanded version of the book that Schulberg reissued in 1983 under the longer title Writers in America: The Four Seasons of Success. It offers his later reflections on the writers in question that aren't in the original 1972 book, his "final word," as it were.

Just for the record, I hate the term "middle-aged." Who the hell wants to be middle-aged? You want to be young, or even an old coot, but definitely not middle-aged/" It evokes such words as middlebrow, middle-of-the-road, middle-school, bulging middle, middling, mid-to-fair, and other unbearably boring things. (Frank, notice I did NOT say "middle-west." I've been there, and I know that it's actually anything but boring. Wink.)
"Thought is a strenuous art -- few practice it, and then only at rare times." - David Ben-Gurion

User avatar
Chuck Messer
Posts: 2089
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 9:15 pm
Location: Lakewood, Colorado

Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Chuck Messer » Tue Nov 04, 2014 4:55 am

Robert, how about the Chili's Round Table? Or the Applebee's Round Table?

Black-eyed Pea Round Table?

Chuck
Some people are wedded to their ideology the way nuns are wed to God.


Return to “General”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests