Robert Nason's Culture Café

General discussions of interest to readers and fans of Harlan Ellison.

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Tony Rabig
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Tony Rabig » Tue Nov 04, 2014 8:44 am

Robert,

Picked up the revised Four Seasons as an ebook when Open Road did a whole mess of Schulberg a couple of years ago; that book still holds up. First ran across it, if memory serves, excerpted in the late lamented magazine Intellectual Digest, and I think Harlan's mentioned the book from time to time -- pretty sure I remember him quoting Schulberg comparing a writer's body of work to a mountain range.

And it probably couldn't hurt to mention your article in the Pavilion.

Bests,
--tr

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Ezra Lb. » Tue Nov 04, 2014 8:10 pm

Robert, congrats on the article. Boy you got to toot your own bugle, as Granny used to say when she got into the corn. I think a little pridefulness and even a bit of arrogance is in order. Neither you nor Mr Tiedemann have cause for humility. It speaks well of you but it is way overrated as a personal trait.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Douglas Harrison
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Douglas Harrison » Wed Nov 05, 2014 1:43 am

I'm glad I got on this Robert Nason train early. I do like a window seat.

D.

Mark Tiedemann
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Mark Tiedemann » Wed Nov 05, 2014 7:00 am

Ezra Lb. wrote:Robert, congrats on the article. Boy you got to toot your own bugle, as Granny used to say when she got into the corn. I think a little pridefulness and even a bit of arrogance is in order. Neither you nor Mr Tiedemann have cause for humility. It speaks well of you but it is way overrated as a personal trait.


Thanks, Ez. It's just that I've never learned how to brag humbly.

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Chuck Messer
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Chuck Messer » Wed Nov 05, 2014 8:31 am

"It ain't brag if you can do and do it." -- Mohammed Ali
Some people are wedded to their ideology the way nuns are wed to God.

Mark Tiedemann
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Mark Tiedemann » Wed Nov 05, 2014 8:40 am

Chuck Messer wrote:"It ain't brag if you can do and do it." -- Mohammed Ali


It ain't what it is but what it looks like.

It's an interesting question of style, mainly. There's a line between self-promotion and self-aggrandizement that's fuzzy and requires a fine touch to navigate. I find I can go into blissful raves about other people's work but when it comes to my own I always feel a bit "false" when I say "Yeah, you should read my work, I'm really good!" I'd like to say I know why this is, but I don't, it's just a feeling. I'm perfectly confident that my work is worthwhile, otherwise I wouldn't try to get it published, but I'm always brought up short when I have to pimp it. I don't know how to do that without sounding, in my own head, like an arrogant ass.

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Ezra Lb.
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Ezra Lb. » Wed Nov 05, 2014 10:29 am

Mark I can understand your point of view. But I can safely say that going over to the Pavilion and merely announcing that you have produced a cultural artifact that is now available for the edification of all and sundry does not cross that line.

Toot your bugle, boy, toot your bugle.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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FrankChurch
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby FrankChurch » Wed Nov 05, 2014 12:15 pm

Toot it. Keep it sharp.

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Robert Nason
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Robert Nason » Wed Nov 19, 2014 3:43 pm

Mark, I think certain professions offer an easier opportunity for self-promotion or outright boasting than others. Wrestlers and boxers are virtually required to boast about themselves as much as possible. Actors can play shy, but unless they're in the De Niro stratosphere, they have to go out and pitch themselves and their latest product. Coffeeshops (the old-fashioned, pre-Starbucks kind) invariably have a "World's Best Coffee" sign in the window, and I lost count of how many Pizza parlors pack your pie in a large box with the words "You'd Tried All the Rest -- Now Try the Best" on the top. Plumbers rarely brag, they just charge you a lot so you get the point. True geniuses like Einstein or Newton prefer to downplay their genius, with such modest remarks as "I have only seen so far because I've stood on the shoulders of the giants who came before me," etc. If you're universally acknowledged as a genius, you don't have to say to people, "Hey, I'm a genius." People who attended Yale prefer not to mention the name when asked where they went to college; they just say, "Oh, I went to school in New Haven." With writers, it depends a lot on what you write. Stan Lee was so embarrassed in the 1950s that he wrote comics that at dinner parties he would respond to the inevitable "So what do you do"" by saying "Oh, I write for young people." When pressed further, he'd finally admit he wrote for comics, and people would look at him as if he were a leper. That's how low-status the comics profession was in the good old Fifties.

Tony, Intellectual Digest rings a bell, but I can't quite recall it. It's hard to imagine a magazine calling itself that today. The word intellectual is deadly in today's publishing marketplace.

Chuck, all my friends look down on Applebee's and won't eat there with me. I've occasionally had dinner there, and the food isn't at all bad, though the prices are a bit steep. I'm not sure if my friends are exhibiting snobbery or just wanting to avoid the giant TVs blaring sports events while you try to sip your margarita. I'm with them on that. I can't decide which grates against my nerve endings more, the loud and obnoxious sportscasters, the sounds of the loud and obnocious fans in the stadium, or the screaming of the loud and obnoxious customers in the restaruant watching the game. Now that I think of it, I'm going to avoid ever eating there again.

Douglas, I hope my train runs more like a Janpanese bullet train and less like the 7 train on the NY subway tracks.
"Thought is a strenuous art -- few practice it, and then only at rare times." - David Ben-Gurion

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Chuck Messer
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Chuck Messer » Thu Nov 20, 2014 1:00 am

I'm not that fond of Applebee's either. One evening, I went there for a bite to eat and they had kareoke set up. The second singer up had a voice like someone was torturing a mountain lion. She apologized several times. I couldn't get any of the wait staff to even look at me. Veni Vidi Phooey. I came, I saw, I left.

Meh.

Chuck
Some people are wedded to their ideology the way nuns are wed to God.

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FrankChurch
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby FrankChurch » Thu Nov 20, 2014 3:13 pm

Nason, Republicans in red states tend to hate train building.

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Steve Barber
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Steve Barber » Fri Nov 21, 2014 9:46 am

There ya go, Robert. Harlan is definitely pleased and supportive.

Good on ya!
All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Steve Barber
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Steve Barber » Fri Nov 21, 2014 9:51 am

Applebee's.

Eaten there precisely two times. Once back in Virginia when we went visiting my sister, and second while killing time before picking up our first dog in 2000.

I've got nothing really against them, per se, but in the same way I tend away from Denny's, Chili's, Olive Garden, Red Lobster, Red Robin and others, I simply prefer to find a local place to spend my cash. With the exception of lunch yesterday at a Whataburger, every meal on this trip has been at a local's joint.

It's simply what I prefer. The money helps a local business stay afloat, and it's usually a more memorable meal.
All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Lori Koonce
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby Lori Koonce » Fri Nov 21, 2014 1:01 pm

Hey Steve,

Do you listen to Internet radio at all? I just started listening to Live365 again. It is one of the first internet radio sites.

Anyway, they have a station called Amateur Travler. It is a talk station about travel. I listened to it and thought of you immediately. It talks about things to do and all the stuff you'd wanna know before visiting a place for the first time. The people giving the information are native to the country so you know its going to be good info.

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FrankChurch
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Re: Robert Nason's Culture Café

Postby FrankChurch » Fri Nov 21, 2014 1:41 pm

Boy, I thought internet radio was going to be a real big reform. Boy was I wrong. They use youtube now like radio--I guess they want people to look at them as well.

Podcasts are still swell.


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