Pavilion Digest: August 2009

A plethora of perplexing pavilion posts. The Pavilion Annex thread, the Pavilion Discussion thread, and monthly digests of all messages from the Pavilion.

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Le

SLIPPAGE presented / San Francisco / Poe article/ Feather cr

Postby Le » Sat Aug 01, 2009 8:13 pm

Name: Le
Source: unca20091007.htm
When I visited my best friend (and fellow Ellison fan) in Northern California this past week, I presented him with the limited edition of SLIPPAGE. He is now the proud owner of #898. (I am the proud owner of #1193) After he opened it, he gave me a big hug. I went through it with him and told him my favorite stories therein. I especially told him to read those intermittent installments on the ordeal Mr. Ellison endured with his first wife, Charlotte.

I convinced him to move up DREAMS WITH SHARP TEETH on his Netflix queue.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

While in San Francisco, I visited the Robert Frank and Richard Avedon photo exhibits at SFMOMA. There was one striking photograph by Avedon It is entitled "Ronald Fischer"(a beekeeper). He is bald and appears white as an albino against a white limbo background. He is partially covered with bees:
http://www.metmuseum.org/special/Richard_Avedon/7.L.htm

I also loved "The Americans" photo exhibit by Robert Frank...photos like "Parade -- Hoboken," New Jersey, 1955, and that eerie of the interior of a roadide coffee shop I forgot the title of: http://www.flickr.com/photos/owenmoss/2906293089/

Oh, for those interested in photography, I highly recommend a group at flickr.com devoted to photographs inspired by the films of Terrenc Malick (and Malick's THE THIN RED LINE is my favorite film of all time):
http://www.flickr.com/groups/malick/

A while back, someone mentioned the Leo and Diane Dillon art exhibit at Fusion Designs Gallery. I learned that Fusion also made greeting cards with illustrations by the Dillons. I visited one of the stores that distributed their cards, and purchased the four with the Dillons' work on them. My favorite of the bunch is a spectacular one called "Oz" (LD 015), and it shows profiles of Dorothty, the Scarecrow, the Cowardly Lion, the Tinman, and Toto as they walk through a dark forest. Another is called "Flower Remedies" (LD 024), and looks like a woodblock print of a woman holding a single flower. Next is an amusing one called "Dance 3"(LD 030). It shows an African American woman with an afro and pointed ears (she looks very similar to the female on the cover of STRANGE WINE). She has her arm around a wolf who is standing next to her and who has his paw around her. They are both looking at directly at the viewer. The fourth one is not so special. It's called "June"(LD 109). it is the profile of a young firl with an owl on her shoulder.

I bought three of each. I intend to contact Fusion Designs Gallery later on to see whether I can purchase the Dillons's other greeting cards directly from them.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Chuck Messer and Jim Thomas -

I am glad you both found that article (http://rmmla.wsu.edu/ereview/58.2/articles/baraban.asp) on Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" interesting. I think the best form of literary criticism helps one view the work with greater appreciation and understanding. This one did in spades.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I just watched the film LITTLE CHILDREN. There is a scene in which a minor character played by Jennifer Connelly interviews a boy whose father has been killed in Iraq. The boy says that when the men came to inform the family of his father's death, he cried...but his mother didn't. She went up into the bedroom and cut off the covers to the pillows. He explained that she was trying to find the "crowns." He said his father had "two crowns."

I didn't know what he meant by this. But after some searching online, I found out a website that collects photos of death crowns left by the deceased. I had never heard of these "death crowns" before, but they can only be found in feather pillows. Some say they signify that the person had gone to heaven. I don't know about *that,* but it's uncanny the way those feathers form those spiral patterns like that....
http://www.carrollscorner.net/FeatherDeathCrowns.htm








Le

SLIPPAGE presented / San Francisco / Poe article/ Feather cr

Postby Le » Sat Aug 01, 2009 8:13 pm

Name: Le
Source: unca20091009.htm
When I visited my best friend (and fellow Ellison fan) in Northern California this past week, I presented him with the limited edition of SLIPPAGE. He is now the proud owner of #898. (I am the proud owner of #1193) After he opened it, he gave me a big hug. I went through it with him and told him my favorite stories therein. I especially told him to read those intermittent installments on the ordeal Mr. Ellison endured with his first wife, Charlotte.

I convinced him to move up DREAMS WITH SHARP TEETH on his Netflix queue.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

While in San Francisco, I visited the Robert Frank and Richard Avedon photo exhibits at SFMOMA. There was one striking photograph by Avedon It is entitled "Ronald Fischer"(a beekeeper). He is bald and appears white as an albino against a white limbo background. He is partially covered with bees:
http://www.metmuseum.org/special/Richard_Avedon/7.L.htm

I also loved "The Americans" photo exhibit by Robert Frank...photos like "Parade -- Hoboken," New Jersey, 1955, and that eerie of the interior of a roadide coffee shop I forgot the title of: http://www.flickr.com/photos/owenmoss/2906293089/

Oh, for those interested in photography, I highly recommend a group at flickr.com devoted to photographs inspired by the films of Terrenc Malick (and Malick's THE THIN RED LINE is my favorite film of all time):
http://www.flickr.com/groups/malick/

A while back, someone mentioned the Leo and Diane Dillon art exhibit at Fusion Designs Gallery. I learned that Fusion also made greeting cards with illustrations by the Dillons. I visited one of the stores that distributed their cards, and purchased the four with the Dillons' work on them. My favorite of the bunch is a spectacular one called "Oz" (LD 015), and it shows profiles of Dorothty, the Scarecrow, the Cowardly Lion, the Tinman, and Toto as they walk through a dark forest. Another is called "Flower Remedies" (LD 024), and looks like a woodblock print of a woman holding a single flower. Next is an amusing one called "Dance 3"(LD 030). It shows an African American woman with an afro and pointed ears (she looks very similar to the female on the cover of STRANGE WINE). She has her arm around a wolf who is standing next to her and who has his paw around her. They are both looking at directly at the viewer. The fourth one is not so special. It's called "June"(LD 109). it is the profile of a young firl with an owl on her shoulder.

I bought three of each. I intend to contact Fusion Designs Gallery later on to see whether I can purchase the Dillons's other greeting cards directly from them.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Chuck Messer and Jim Thomas -

I am glad you both found that article (http://rmmla.wsu.edu/ereview/58.2/articles/baraban.asp) on Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" interesting. I think the best form of literary criticism helps one view the work with greater appreciation and understanding. This one did in spades.

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

I just watched the film LITTLE CHILDREN. There is a scene in which a minor character played by Jennifer Connelly interviews a boy whose father has been killed in Iraq. The boy says that when the men came to inform the family of his father's death, he cried...but his mother didn't. She went up into the bedroom and cut off the covers to the pillows. He explained that she was trying to find the "crowns." He said his father had "two crowns."

I didn't know what he meant by this. But after some searching online, I found out a website that collects photos of death crowns left by the deceased. I had never heard of these "death crowns" before, but they can only be found in feather pillows. Some say they signify that the person had gone to heaven. I don't know about *that,* but it's uncanny the way those feathers form those spiral patterns like that....
http://www.carrollscorner.net/FeatherDeathCrowns.htm








Le

Addendeum: Mad TV

Postby Le » Sat Aug 01, 2009 8:58 pm

Name: Le
Source: unca20091007.htm
Sorry; I meant to include this with my last message. It's hilarious. The Terminator travels back to biblical times to prevent Jesus's crucifixtion, not realizing that Jesus is SUPPOSED TO BE CDRUCIFIED! In one scene, the Terminator sees Judas. The camera assumes his POV and the words "WILL BETRAY JESUS" appear in the Terminator's vision. Then he kills Judas!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJKye7J3-54

Le

Addendeum: Mad TV

Postby Le » Sat Aug 01, 2009 8:58 pm

Name: Le
Source: unca20091009.htm
Sorry; I meant to include this with my last message. It's hilarious. The Terminator travels back to biblical times to prevent Jesus's crucifixtion, not realizing that Jesus is SUPPOSED TO BE CDRUCIFIED! In one scene, the Terminator sees Judas. The camera assumes his POV and the words "WILL BETRAY JESUS" appear in the Terminator's vision. Then he kills Judas!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJKye7J3-54

Alan Coil
Posts: 538
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:21 pm
Location: Southeast Michigan

Postby Alan Coil » Sat Aug 01, 2009 10:16 pm

Name: Alan Coil
Source: unca20091007.htm
Be kind to your friends and lovers. You never know which moment might be your last moment with them.

I almost hit a motorcyclist today. Never saw him. He didn't come from behind me, so he must have come from the entrance ramp to the expressway. I was in the center lane, knew I had to be in the right lane in a mile or so, so I moved over. As I finished moving over, I saw him, swerving, in my side mirror. As we were both doing around 70mph, I'm quite sure I would have killed him had I connected.

It would have been the last day on earth for him, and the beginning of many sleepless nights, and maybe some jail time, for me.

Alan Coil
Posts: 538
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:21 pm
Location: Southeast Michigan

Postby Alan Coil » Sat Aug 01, 2009 10:16 pm

Name: Alan Coil
Source: unca20091009.htm
Be kind to your friends and lovers. You never know which moment might be your last moment with them.

I almost hit a motorcyclist today. Never saw him. He didn't come from behind me, so he must have come from the entrance ramp to the expressway. I was in the center lane, knew I had to be in the right lane in a mile or so, so I moved over. As I finished moving over, I saw him, swerving, in my side mirror. As we were both doing around 70mph, I'm quite sure I would have killed him had I connected.

It would have been the last day on earth for him, and the beginning of many sleepless nights, and maybe some jail time, for me.

User avatar
Jan
Posts: 1817
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 2:25 pm
Location: Köln

Postby Jan » Sun Aug 02, 2009 2:47 am

Name: Jan
Source: unca20091007.htm
Steve, those are ups and downs indeed.

OK, Harlan, I overlooked one big article on DV that Delos (106) did last year in connection with their New Wave retrospective series of essays:
www.fantascienza.com/magazine/speciali/ ... e-di-altr/
Elsewhere I came across "Harlan Ellison, una bibliografia cronologica", a 71 page international publication list (1947-2007) edited by Marcello Bonati of Intercom Science Fiction Station (sources unknown). It's a downloadable color brochure in PDF format (Acrobat Reader).
www.intercom-sf.com/modules.php?name=Ne ... le&sid=430 (download link below biographical summary).
I "photographed" a page: http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/1299/bibl.jpg
Well, that takes care of all that, I think.

I would suggest that the political/ideological discussions go elsewhere now.

User avatar
Jan
Posts: 1817
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 2:25 pm
Location: Köln

Postby Jan » Sun Aug 02, 2009 2:47 am

Name: Jan
Source: unca20091009.htm
Steve, those are ups and downs indeed.

OK, Harlan, I overlooked one big article on DV that Delos (106) did last year in connection with their New Wave retrospective series of essays:
www.fantascienza.com/magazine/speciali/ ... e-di-altr/
Elsewhere I came across "Harlan Ellison, una bibliografia cronologica", a 71 page international publication list (1947-2007) edited by Marcello Bonati of Intercom Science Fiction Station (sources unknown). It's a downloadable color brochure in PDF format (Acrobat Reader).
www.intercom-sf.com/modules.php?name=Ne ... le&sid=430 (download link below biographical summary).
I "photographed" a page: http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/1299/bibl.jpg
Well, that takes care of all that, I think.

I would suggest that the political/ideological discussions go elsewhere now.

john zeock
Posts: 167
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:30 pm

shopping note

Postby john zeock » Sun Aug 02, 2009 3:04 am

Name: john zeock
Source: unca20091007.htm
Barnes and Noble put out a "Rediscovery " series-attractive hardcovers between 9.95 and 14.95 . I bought a book by Ted Hughes on Shakespeare and the Goddess that goes way beyond Graves and damn near got him burned in academic effigy. There's a memoir by Stendhal; Rommel's book on infantry and a dozen or so others. I bring it up here for REALLY THE BLUES by Mezz Mezzrow and Bernard Wolfe-a wonderful book. I know that Wolfe is a favorite of Harlan's. (by the by,got a copy of THE LATE RISERS, also a wonderful book) Trivia answer-WOMAN-recorded by John Lennon and by Peter And Gordon-Gordon Waller passing away on July 17. Always liked that record.

john zeock
Posts: 167
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:30 pm

shopping note

Postby john zeock » Sun Aug 02, 2009 3:04 am

Name: john zeock
Source: unca20091009.htm
Barnes and Noble put out a "Rediscovery " series-attractive hardcovers between 9.95 and 14.95 . I bought a book by Ted Hughes on Shakespeare and the Goddess that goes way beyond Graves and damn near got him burned in academic effigy. There's a memoir by Stendhal; Rommel's book on infantry and a dozen or so others. I bring it up here for REALLY THE BLUES by Mezz Mezzrow and Bernard Wolfe-a wonderful book. I know that Wolfe is a favorite of Harlan's. (by the by,got a copy of THE LATE RISERS, also a wonderful book) Trivia answer-WOMAN-recorded by John Lennon and by Peter And Gordon-Gordon Waller passing away on July 17. Always liked that record.

john zeock
Posts: 167
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:30 pm

add

Postby john zeock » Sun Aug 02, 2009 3:05 am

Name: john zeock
Source: unca20091007.htm
The latter written by Paul McCartney as "Bernard Webb. "

john zeock
Posts: 167
Joined: Sat May 26, 2012 6:30 pm

add

Postby john zeock » Sun Aug 02, 2009 3:05 am

Name: john zeock
Source: unca20091009.htm
The latter written by Paul McCartney as "Bernard Webb. "

User avatar
Chuck Messer
Posts: 2089
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 9:15 pm
Location: Lakewood, Colorado

Postby Chuck Messer » Sun Aug 02, 2009 5:05 am

Name: Chuck Messer
Source: unca20091007.htm
If the anti-government extremists want to live in a place where the government is minimal and people can do as they pretty well please, they should move to Somalia. Hardly any government at all. Lots of opportunity for an entrepeneur who can get financing for a speedboat, some automatic weapons and RPG's.

Chuck

User avatar
Chuck Messer
Posts: 2089
Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 9:15 pm
Location: Lakewood, Colorado

Postby Chuck Messer » Sun Aug 02, 2009 5:05 am

Name: Chuck Messer
Source: unca20091009.htm
If the anti-government extremists want to live in a place where the government is minimal and people can do as they pretty well please, they should move to Somalia. Hardly any government at all. Lots of opportunity for an entrepeneur who can get financing for a speedboat, some automatic weapons and RPG's.

Chuck

User avatar
Samuel John Klein
Posts: 342
Joined: Wed Jul 29, 2009 12:43 am
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

When TV Strove To Tell Good Stories; The Plural Of David Lof

Postby Samuel John Klein » Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:10 am

Name: Samuel John Klein
Source: unca20091007.htm
(Righter's Note: a couple of habitues here suggested I post this here. So here we are. Enjoy!)

So, I was watching an episode from the classic The Twilight Zone yesterday.

Thank Whatever You Call God Or The Creator for the Intertubes. I was able to read up and watch an entire half-hour of classic television for free (well, they've figured out how to stick commercials in it, but I've been conditioned to accept that by thirty years of TV watching, it's not the worst i've had to endure).

Anyway, for some reason, I found myself watching "The Midnight Sun", which is the kind of end-of-the-world doom tale that I dote on (and which, for many years, frightened me of the Sun. I work 3rd shift now. Coincidence?). Maybe I was just punishing myself to be watching this strange tale in the middle of the most sweltering heat wave the Pacific Northwest in general and Oregon in particular in the last thirty years, I don't know.

I, for some reason, feel drawn to stories where the 'end of the world', however you define it, is imminent and palpable (such as "The Midnight Sun") or just in the rear-view mirror (The Omega Man, Lord forgive me). And "The Midnight Sun" not only has the characters staring down the barrel of TEOTWAWKI, even in the twist ending, but it has more than that and less.

The following will seem trite, as It's been observed by everyone who bemoans the state of television up to me, but they were able to do so much make you feel as though you are trapped on an Earth that is spiralling into the Sun, make you believe that the Sun never sets, give you the feeling of extreme heat and torpor, with FX that would be laughably simple to the jaded TV FX geek of today. One choice shot of a deserted street, one FX composite of a big, bright light over an urban skyline, views of a skyline background through the windows, everything high-valued (which is important when the whole thing was done in brilliant black-and-white), and the characters expressed what couldn't be seen by their motions.

Everything acted in that production, even the inanimate objects! It didn't hurt that the actors did a fine job of communicating the act of being actively stifled. And the real amazement on this was that what the early-60s-era special effects actually engaged you despite the fact it was TV, you weren't passive. Your mind was filling in the bright colors, the blinding light it was drawing you into the doomed Earth of the teleplay.

It was then I realized one thing that I didn't know about me. I figured out I was born about thirty or forty years too late. I have, from time to time, fancied myself a real writer, for various reasons; If you hit it big, you became rather rich, and then later, as I grew maturer within myself, I realized that I write because of the feeling I"m getting right now; forming words and incarnating thoughts into coherent sentence really fucking feels good. It's when I really feel alive!

How much cooler would it have been to have been on the frontier of forging what great television could have been? Slugging away making a living (probably underpaid) striving to tell great stories and good drama on television? I should have been a young adult then. The real interesting thing is, you didn't know back then you were defining the acme of what TV storytelling could be then. There are some great examples now, but most of the buzz is around things that recycle other things. The people who wrote for TZ were unafraid. I'll bet most of them thought that TV could only go upward from there.

But it would have been a kick in the absolute ass to be on the front lines of media back then. Name were made, and monuments were constructed, and when they think of the greatness that story telling on TV could be, what do they think? Shows like Twilight Zone, constructed by serious dramatists who were inspired by iconoclast playwrights, who had amazing things to day and fooled everyone into watching it and thinking about what they were saying and without knowing it, starting to evolve.

Would they have worked any differently, knowing that it was mostly going to be downhill from there?

If the screenwriters of today tried to tell "The Midnight Sun" with today's FX technology, you would have gotten a visual treat but one that would have been ultimately dull. And you would have let it wash over you, not fallen into it.

There's a reason McLuhan called in "The Vast Wasteland". He saw the rot coming, years before everyone else did. They thought he was just being fresh.

We've come so far.

In other news:
PAUL ATX: Yes. The plural of David Loftus would be David Lofti. Much less awkward than "Loftuses". We need more David Lofti!

ROB: It would not be the first time conservatives repudiated something that was once the heart of their brand and won them hearts and minds when those hearts and minds no longer could be won. It's astoundingly predictable actually. If Colridge's Ancient Mariner were conservative, he would believe that he would rid himself of the Albatross by simply denying it.


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