The October Country. . .

For the discussion of Movies, Television, Comics, and other existential distractions.

Moderator: Moderator

User avatar
Steve Evil
Posts: 3519
Joined: Tue Jan 06, 2004 3:22 pm
Location: Some Cave in Kanata
Contact:

The October Country. . .

Postby Steve Evil » Thu Oct 02, 2008 2:16 pm

Ah, another autumn has arrived! Only 29 more days 'till Hallow's Eve!

For years I've greeted the season with a recitation of the intro to Bradbury's October Country, the most wonderful tribute to the weather I think every written (a grand statement I know - maybe you gotta be Southern Ontarian).

Trouble is, I've lost the book. I think it was left behind in a move. The local libraries don't have it, the bookstores don't have it. I can't find it. My ritual's been interrupted, and I am incomplete :cry:

Does anybody else remember how it went? Just a line or two, don't break copywrite or nothin', just a line about the coal bins, the cellars, the dusks and the twilights. . . it just ain't the same without it!

User avatar
Moderator
Site Admin
Posts: 10607
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2006 12:17 pm
Contact:

Postby Moderator » Thu Oct 02, 2008 2:28 pm

- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Postby David Loftus » Thu Oct 02, 2008 3:17 pm

I'm re-memorizing a personal favorite, "The Utterly Perfect Murder," from Bradbury's 1976 collection, Long After Midnight.

No special occasion, except maybe the upcoming cast party for "Antigone." I'd just like to have it on hand any time I want to whip it out. I've memorized and recited it several times over the past 20 years, so huge chunks of it come back easily and readily. Just have to get the connective tissue down again. . . .
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

User avatar
FrankChurch
Posts: 16283
Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 2:19 pm

Postby FrankChurch » Fri Oct 03, 2008 10:23 am

Steve, Bradbury doesn't write books about the rich and famous or about diets, so real authors get hidden behind the dental floss.

Try Amazon sweetbriar. You guys can keep those cold fronts this year.

User avatar
David Loftus
Posts: 3182
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2004 2:15 pm
Location: Portland, Oregon
Contact:

Postby David Loftus » Wed Oct 29, 2008 11:53 am

David Loftus wrote:I'm re-memorizing a personal favorite, "The Utterly Perfect Murder," from Bradbury's 1976 collection, Long After Midnight.



Recitation went very well last night.

I'd REALLY like to recite the thing again for a pagan Hallowe'en party -- I've been engaged to close it down at 1 a.m. with a reading -- but that's a paying gig so it'd probably be a violation of copywrite.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus


Return to “Pop Culture”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests