Driving Music

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Duane
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Driving Music

Postby Duane » Mon Jan 05, 2009 11:30 pm

A quick story about the 1,900 mile Christmas drive I took to visit family this holiday season:

As I navigated the "great triangle" (as I call it) from LA to eastern Arizona and up the back way (through Moab and Price) to Salt Lake City and back to LA, I was accompanied by some great music. Nothing makes navigating icy, snow blown roads out in the middle of nowhere more of a joy than having some inspiring tuneage to take your mind off your imminent demise.

I prepared judiciously for this trip. Among the many CDs I brought to keep me company along the way were brand spanking new albums by Metallica, The Flower Kings, Symphony X, Nightwish, Opeth, Kamelot, Between The Buried and Me, and Trivium. Great albums all, and I highly recommend them (particularly the Opeth album, Watershed) unless you aren't a confirmed metalhead. In which case, why aren't you?

But there was one surprise, and it left me wondering "Where has this guy been all my life?"

The album was "Necktie Second" by Pete Droge.

He came to my attention when he did an album with Matthew Sweet and Shawn Mullins called "The Thorns" (excellent Eagles influenced acoustic rock), and I picked up his "Necktie Second" album at a used CD store for $1.99.

Folks, this album is solid gold.

Half the albums I brought I didn't listen to because I spent so much time spinning this disc in my player.

Think alt.country with an Evan Dando/Lemonheads feel. Touches of Johnny Cash, particularly on the heartbreaking "Dog on a chain". "If you don't love me (I'll kill myself)" opens the album, and it's a lot more fun than the title would indicate (in fact, it's pretty funny).

There's something about "driving music," and I think it's the reason why I was drawn to this cd so much on my trip. There is a certain "rhythm" to the road. The gentle curves, the hypnotic regularity of power poles, fences, and character infused tiny towns. And then there's the cinematic view of the wide open scenery that power/progressive/symphonic metal just doesn't provide the appropriate soundtrack for. But that wasn't the only reason I went to "Necktie Second" time and time again. It's just GOOD! Check it out; I command you.

(Other recommended artists in the genre: Ryan Adams, Pete Yorn, Matthew Sweet.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gH8t9M-A7uY <-- "If you don't love me (I'll kill myself)

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Postby Moderator » Tue Jan 06, 2009 8:33 am

I have several "driving cds" but lean a lot more towards upbeat popular music rather than metal. My current favorite compilation (made with legal downloads from iTunes) consists of the Rogue Traders' "Voodoo Child"; Kqumba Zoo's "The Child Inside"; too many Kylie Minogue and George Michael tracks to publicly admit; The Allman Brothers' "Jessica" of course (only the greatest driving piece of music ever); Nina Simone's "Sinner Man"; and Madonna's "Hung Up" and "I Love New York" (though the opening police siren in that track always gives me a jump).

This usually gets me as far as Victorville or Barstow, depending upon which direction I'm traveling. After that it's Cris' cds and jazz.
Last edited by Moderator on Tue Jan 06, 2009 8:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Ezra Lb.
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Postby Ezra Lb. » Tue Jan 06, 2009 8:34 am

Great song Duane, thanks.

I once drove from Atlanta to New Orleans with nothing but a cassette tape of Sonic Youth's Daydream Nation. Between SY and the radio evangelists it got pretty surreal.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Tue Jan 06, 2009 10:51 am

I've always thought Earth, Wind & Fire would be great long-distance driving music.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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Steve Evil
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Postby Steve Evil » Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:11 am

I caught Pete Droge when he opened for Neil Young back in '97. My favorate song was "If you don't love me I'll kill myself".

The new Metallica is the best in a long, long time. Perhaps not a classic, but actually listenable, which many of us thrasher types dispared of ever hearing again.

I have a special tape (YES! A TAPE!) of driving songs. They tend to centre of the theme of (get this) driving, roads, travelling, speeding, motorized vehicles etc. Stanards include: "Wolf to the Moon" by Blackmore's Rainbow ("SLAAAAVe to the highwaaaaayy. . .")
Deep Purple's "Highway Star" .
Accept's "Midnight Highway",
Cinderella's "Gypsy Roads" (which, unlike country roads, CAN"T take me home")
Priests' "Heading out to the Highway",
Golden Earing's "Radar Love",
Kiss' "Detroit Rock City",
Rob Halford's "Drive"
Twisted Sister's "Ride to live, Live to ride"
Saxon's "Motorcycle Man" ("Princess of the Night" is great to, though not specifically about driving. But then again, neither is Motorhead's "Killed By Death" or Overkill's "Long Black Line" which nevertheless pummel along towards an eternally distant horizon)

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Tue Jan 06, 2009 2:08 pm

What about Ventura Highway, by America?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dd2Ch6WBeQU

Get with it, ya guys.

Steely Dan is great on the road. Prince, obviously. Moody Jazz at night, metal with a melody when it gets frisky. Sonic Youth is a good pick. Goo is their album for me:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WJ3o04luF5s

Old school r&b is always great. Etta James, James Brown, Stevie Wonder. 50s stuff like Elvis, Eddie Cockran always work on the road. Decent country works, to impress your trucker buddies.

David Bowie is great road music. Big band jazz. Swirlie bands like the Church:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBIxiJSd ... re=related

Harcore punk is great road music, especially around the sick irony that is Las Vegas:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pxKFImER ... re=related

Soft music works as well. Tuck & Patti:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEYaLGUzxtk

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Postby Moderator » Tue Jan 06, 2009 2:17 pm

Actually, Steely Dan IS perfect for driving through the desert. Shocked I never thunk a that.
- I love to find adventure. All I need is a change of clothes, my Nikon, an open mind and a strong cup of coffee.

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Postby cynic » Tue Jan 06, 2009 4:20 pm

almost posted this last night after duanes post
A Steely Dan Middle-of-the-Night Drive
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_mxD13feFk
the 5th on my ytube list

i lay off metal on long drives,110 mph. comes too easy(dozens of 1-17 hundred ml. trips).

till the coffee and no-doze need help
Metallica- Enter Sandman
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jRYDetbwegs

doug,
my fingers are crossed that you will soon be rolling safely over any black ice on the road ahead.
mike

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Postby reddragon70 » Tue Jan 06, 2009 6:22 pm

My personal favourite drivning CD is Audioslave - Audioslave. Its just a wonderful album and sadly their later Cds just couldnt encompass the sheer wonderful range of music on the first.

Rage Against the Machine is good but as has been pointed out.... 100 MPH comes all to easily.

I have found that Pink Floyd can be relaxing on longer journeys.

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Steve Evil
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Postby Steve Evil » Tue Jan 06, 2009 10:12 pm

Believe it or not, there are times I like to chill. As long as it's not a long journey (can't sleep at the wheel), nothing beats BB King, Blue Oyster Cult, or the Dire Straights after a hellish day at work.

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:52 pm

Blue Oyster Cult works for me, too.

Although, if it's just getting off a bad day at work, early Aerosmith and AC/DC might be better.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Wed Jan 07, 2009 2:52 pm


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Ezra Lb.
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Postby Ezra Lb. » Thu Jan 08, 2009 4:21 pm

Ventura Highway?

Frank back away slowly from the jukebox. Keep your hands where I can see'em...
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

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FrankChurch
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Postby FrankChurch » Fri Jan 09, 2009 10:49 am

Ventura Highway babee. Got my hands all over that Juke Box. May press the Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds cut next.

Diamond stylus, sink that well!

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David Loftus
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Postby David Loftus » Fri Jan 09, 2009 1:22 pm

FrankChurch wrote:Ventura Highway babee. Got my hands all over that Juke Box. May press the Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds cut next



Wow, now there's a name that's a blast from the ancient past!

Although I couldn't help thinking there was something anatomically incorrect about the refrain "Don't pull your love out on me, baby," however metaphorical it was meant to be.
War is, at first, the hope that one will be better off; next, the expectation that the other fellow will be worse off; then, the satisfaction that he isn't any better off; and, finally, the surprise at everyone's being worse off. - Karl Kraus


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