Coraline

For the discussion of Movies, Television, Comics, and other existential distractions.

Moderator: Moderator

Alan Coil
Posts: 538
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:21 pm
Location: Southeast Michigan

Coraline

Postby Alan Coil » Sat Feb 07, 2009 10:04 am

NO SPOILERS IN THIS POST

I saw Coraline yesterday. (Rhymes with none.) It's a swell movie, with good story and good art.

This is not the old fashioned 3-D with the glasses with red and blue lenses. As I haven't seen this type of 3-D before, I was concerned that I might not see the 3-D. I have poor depth perception. But it worked for me, although I have no way of figuring out exactly how much I should have been seeing.

I did miss a couple bits of the 3-D action because I looked away from the screen for a moment. It is essential to always keep your eyes on the screen.

I have been told that this kind of 3-D cannot be viewed at home on dvd. Is this true? Does anybody here know about such things? As it was explained to me, the picture is reflected off the movie screen, and this effect cannot be duplicated on a tv screen or monitor.

The only negative thing I can say about seeing Coraline is that there is a $3 surcharge to see it.

Alan Coil
Posts: 538
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:21 pm
Location: Southeast Michigan

Postby Alan Coil » Thu Feb 19, 2009 6:46 pm

EZRA SAW CORALINE AND LOVED IT!!!!!

And I saw it for a second time today. I was going to see it Monday of this week, but then I realized it was President's Day, and figured that there would be many younger kids at the movie, thus it would be noisy.

So today, I saw it all by myself. I was the only person in the theater. I took this opportunity to change seats a few times to see if the 3-D effect was better at different distances. It seemed better for me when I was directly level with the screen as opposed to being above or below the center of the screen.

I also noticed the storytelling better this time. Possibly a combination of being used to the 3-D effect and having seen it before.

This is a very good movie, one that should not be missed. I especially appreciated the colors used. And was it just me, or did the 3-D effects seem more vivid during certain scenes? It was as if they wanted certain scenes to be deeper in definition than others.
.

User avatar
Ezra Lb.
Posts: 4547
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:02 am
Location: Washington, DC

Postby Ezra Lb. » Mon Feb 23, 2009 3:15 pm

He sure did.

Sorry I missed this thread altogether or I would have responded earlier.

3D has gotten serious. No more headaches.

I was told by someone in the theater after the movie that this format of 3D could not be replicated on home monitors. I did notice that Journey to the Center of the Earth was released in a 3D version on DVD though. So I don't know. Come to think of it Beowulf was not released on DVD in 3D format.

It will be interesting to see it in regular format just to see if some of the magic fairy dust is lost.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

User avatar
markabaddon
Posts: 1790
Joined: Tue Mar 14, 2006 3:24 pm

Postby markabaddon » Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:37 pm

My review of Coraline, no spoilers:

Coraline written and directed by Henry Selick, original story by Neil Gaiman

When I first heard that Henry Selick was going to be adapting Coraline for the theater, I was enthusiastic, because the man is an artist. I define him as that, rather than as a writer, director, or producer, because of his ability to create these unique images, shepherd them through a painstaking process (stop-motion animation) and produce films whose visual style is unmistakable.

Coraline is a mixture of Alice in Wonderland, a Grimm’s Brothers fairy tale and parts of Pinocchio. In the story, Coraline Jones, a young girl who is bored in her new house and ignored by her parents, goes searching through her new place and discovers a door that leads…elsewhere. Coraline discovers a new world there where her “Other” Mother and Father are happy, attentive, and give her pretty much anything her heart desires. There is just one little catch, though, to stay in this world she will need to sew buttons on her eyes like all of the other creatures that exist there.

When Coraline refuses, the more sinister side of this world becomes apparent, as her “Other” Mother’s desire for total control over her is revealed as is the knowledge that other children over the years have been lured to this realm. Coraline eventually escapes, but has to return and face her antagonist when her parents are taken prisoner by the “Other” Mother.

Not all is great within the film, though, as there are some aspects of it that just did not work. A character that was not in the printed version, Wybie, added nothing to the story. I have no idea why he was added to the film. Also, in the scene with Miss Spink and Miss Forcible (voiced by the magnificent Dawn French and Jennifer Saunders of Absolutely Fabulous fame) there was a bit too much of the characters voluminous flesh showing. Seriously, I did not need to see an overweight puppet’s breasts covered only by a handprint, nor did I think it was appropriate for a movie aimed for kids.

However, those are fairly minor points and the rest of the movie looked spectacular, moved along at a good pace and, if I had to pick one surprising bright point, had excellent music that really flowed with the film and enhanced the mood of each scene.

Neil Gaiman is very fond of the quote by G.K. Chesterton that, to paraphrase says “Fairy tales are more than real. They teach us not that monsters exist, but that they can be defeated.” This film is a realization of that ideal. While the movie is a very empowering one for children, I would be a bit hesitant about bringing small children to see it. My 4 year old was pretty frightened and sitting in my lap at the final scene, where the “Other” Mother’s true shape is revealed and she chases after Coraline.

Recommended for children ages 6 and up
Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristrocratic forms. No gov't in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, gov't tends more and mroe to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class

Alan Coil
Posts: 538
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:21 pm
Location: Southeast Michigan

Postby Alan Coil » Mon Mar 02, 2009 6:41 pm

Ezra Lb. wrote:I was told by someone in the theater after the movie that this format of 3D could not be replicated on home monitors. I did notice that Journey to the Center of the Earth was released in a 3D version on DVD though.


I don't know, either. I was told this type of 3-D is shown by 2 cameras. The image is reflected by an extra-shiny screen as 2 separate images, which are then filtered through the special glasses one has to wear. This can't be duplicated at--yet. But I don't know anything about this for sure.

reddragon70
Posts: 516
Joined: Wed Oct 15, 2008 5:06 am

Postby reddragon70 » Tue Mar 03, 2009 5:03 am

The modern version of the 3D film does not use the old two coloured lenses any more. The principle is the same though. Two images taken from slightlu different angles. Instead of the red and blue lenses however, polarised lenses are now used, one being polarised horizontally one polarised vertically. This allow each eye to see different images on the screen, creating the 3d effect.

Sadly PC Monitors and TVs cant recreate this kind of 3d and need red and green images. There is however a new possibilty on the horizon for PCs. It involves glasses again and a very special monitor. I saw an article about it in a PC magazine. Sounds amazing if it takes off.

Alan Coil
Posts: 538
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:21 pm
Location: Southeast Michigan

Postby Alan Coil » Tue Mar 03, 2009 9:08 am

reddragon70 wrote:Sadly PC Monitors and TVs cant recreate this kind of 3d and need red and green images. There is however a new possibilty on the horizon for PCs. It involves glasses again and a very special monitor. I saw an article about it in a PC magazine. Sounds amazing if it takes off.


If this happens, it might be a great thing for those of us who have less than stellar depth perception, as it will give us various images to use to try to improve our depth perception. That's what seeing in 3-D is.

User avatar
Ezra Lb.
Posts: 4547
Joined: Wed Sep 01, 2004 8:02 am
Location: Washington, DC

Postby Ezra Lb. » Tue Mar 03, 2009 10:53 am

I did a little research and Journey to the Center of the Earth in 3D is the red/green viewing thing. Which means there'll be one sweet spot in front of the TV and everywhere else will cause you to have an ice pick through the forehead.

But don't bother. JTTCOTE was a steaming pile of ostrich doodoo.
“We must not always talk in the marketplace,” Hester Prynne said, “of what happens to us in the forest.”
-Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

Alan Coil
Posts: 538
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:21 pm
Location: Southeast Michigan

Postby Alan Coil » Tue Mar 03, 2009 1:50 pm

Ezra Lb. wrote:Journey to the Center of the Earth

JTTCOTE was a steaming pile of ostrich doodoo.


Never seen ostrich doodoo, but have been splattered by generic bird doodoo. I'm glad ostriches can't fly.


Return to “Pop Culture”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests