1967 - The City on the Edge of Forever

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Complex
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1967 - The City on the Edge of Forever

Postby Complex » Sat Dec 26, 2009 4:51 pm

Image

Image

Buy the screenplay book.

Or better yet, buy a physical copy of the book directly from Harlan himself (HERC store), or an electronic copy from E-Reads. When it comes to paying the writer, why not eliminate the middlemen? Hell, he'll even autograph the book for you; can amazon.com claim THAT? - Mod.
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The City on the Edge of Forever

I recently watched restored version of this episode and it amazed me how I remembered a detail that was in this episode that wasn't actually there - when Kirk and that broad walk down the street Kirk quotes her something and then stops and points the finger in one of the stars saying it was written there in about 100 years. But I remembered him saying that it was written on one of those stars but in 1995 or something. Which was kind of a disappointment because placing it in 1990's gave me kind of a shiver because it reminded me how people had firm spirit believing in human progress in space exploration.

Nevertheless it's a great episode, but I have some questions which I couldn't find an answer.
Why did they want to send Bones into the past (before he inserted that serum into himself) when he completely recovered by himself with no medical help?
And the second question is how did they came back from XX. century when there was no "time gate" in 30's where they were after going trough that door on that planet?

Also I know that set designer misunderstood the words "covered with runes." with "covered in ruins." and created city in ruins, but then again how different would of that city looked like if it was created covered with runes?

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Jan
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Postby Jan » Sun Dec 27, 2009 3:07 pm

Hi Complex.
Why did they want to send Bones into the past (before he inserted that serum into himself) when he completely recovered by himself with no medical help?
Haha, you're right. They assumed the worst.

And the second question is how did they came back from XX. century when there was no "time gate" in 30's where they were after going through that door on that planet?
There was an invisible entrance point controlled by the guardian.
As for an optimistic notion of the technologies of 1995, you can get your shiver watching "Space Seed", the Khan episode. I think that's what you're remembering.

Gwyneth M905
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Re: 1967 - The City on the Edge of Forever

Postby Gwyneth M905 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 11:17 pm

Complex wrote:I recently watched restored version of this episode and it amazed me how I remembered a detail that was in this episode that wasn't actually there - when Kirk and that broad walk down the street Kirk quotes her something and then stops and points the finger in one of the stars saying it was written there in about 100 years. But I remembered him saying that it was written on one of those stars but in 1995 or something. Which was kind of a disappointment because placing it in 1990's gave me kind of a shiver because it reminded me how people had firm spirit believing in human progress in space exploration.

Of course, it was post-Sputnik and the height of the Cold War. Space was seen as an alternative should the human race blow itself up. When the Berlin Wall came down, the reasons for all the R&D money thrown at NASA crumbled as well. :( Remember all those apocalyptic movies in the '80s that we watched as kids? And "Stop, Drop, and Cover"? The "hide under your schooldesk" in case of Nuclear War? Yeah, those were the days.

Complex wrote:Also I know that set designer misunderstood the words "covered with runes." with "covered in ruins." and created city in ruins, but then again how different would of that city looked like if it was created covered with runes?

If I remember the screenplay correctly, the City was itself a shimmering image on faraway mountains. The nearby stones were marked with runes and glyphs, but were not in and of themselves the "City on the Edge of Forever". The Guardian was the "edge of forever", and his/her/its (?) City was at some distance away.

What if, though. What if the US *winning* WWII and the money diverted to the resultant Cold War arms race kept us from further manned space exploration? But, ugh. Nazis. :(

Nazis and Commies and Sheikhs, oh my!

matthewdavis
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Re: 1967 - The City on the Edge of Forever

Postby matthewdavis » Sun Feb 07, 2010 12:53 pm

“City on the Edge of Forever” in the context of Ellison’s contemporary work.

Often the screenplay is reviewed in relation the Star trek universe, but it’s worth seeing how it draws on images and ideas Ellison was working out at the time.

Circa 1964/65 Ellsion wrote a Hawkman comic treatment “Five Dooms to save Tomorrow”. The plot revolves an otherwise undistinguished man. Leonard Tippet who is visited by the Castellans of Possible Worlds and informed by them that in the multitude of dimensions in the “forking places in probability, objects exist that co-habit many time lines.” He is one of the” Time Focus” objects. “if a certain act had been performed at a certain juncture in the past some tragedy in the past or extrapolated tragedy in the future could be avoided”. To prevent this war Tippet must kill five blameless people. “For the good of mankind, for the preservation of tomorrow, he must sacrifice himself personally and perform acts that are personally and perform acts that are personally repugnant to himself”. Eventually it turns out that Tippet is the Time Focus object who must die to secure the future.
Sound familiar?

This idea of cosmic “Castellans” crops up again in “Bright Eyes” (1964) , as the surviving witnesses of the end of a desolate dying world in “Brighteyes” (1964) and so sound rather like the Guardian in the Star Trek.

That not everyone on a space mission might not be purer than pure is the plot motor in “World of the Myth” (1964), in which the pilot is a cruel rapist.

That the criminal is a drug dealer is of a piece with stories like “Gentleman Junkie”, “Memory of a Muted Trumpet”, “High Dice”; that drugs and addiction are not an alien part of the world that Ellison deals in.

The first Star Trek treatment had elements in common with “Soldier” script: when Kirk and Spock time travel to the 1930s, there is exactly the same heart attack of a street corner vendor as in the “Soldier” script. There was also going to be same hugger-mugger of people from the future not being able to understand the retrograde speech of contemporary America as in “Soldier”. These were both dropped.

The Star Trek’s treatment’s description of the development of the romance between Keeler and Kirk is similar to the bond that develops between the lonely Trent and the woman he has to protect in “Demon With a Glass hand”. This was obviously fleshed out. Also there were originally more cat-and-mouse hunter/hunted adventures between Beckwith and Kirk/Spock, which makes it similar to “Demon with a Glass Hand”.

Ellison’s pride over his derelict crippled ex-soldier Trooper has resonances with his employment of a down-and-out bum in “Paingod” (1964)

The final conversation between Spock and Kirk draws out the theme of a person doing the wrong act for the right reasons and vice versa. Ellison’s effusive praise in his film review of Frankenheimer’s “The Train” (1965) is precisely because it dramatises this theme. (And in “Punky and the Yale Men” when there’s talk of a film adaptation it’s by Frankenheimer – so the film and director had had stuck with Ellison).

Grayson
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Re: 1967 - The City on the Edge of Forever

Postby Grayson » Tue Apr 20, 2010 7:09 pm

(Re-post from the Art Deco Dining Pavilion)

Deleted Scenes: Footage shot but not found in the episodes

THE CITY ON THE EDGE OF FOREVER

http://www.startrekhistory.com/DS6.html

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FinderDoug
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Re: 1967 - The City on the Edge of Forever

Postby FinderDoug » Wed Apr 21, 2010 7:22 am

Grayson - I wasn't aware of the site at all, so as a long-time fan raised from the cradle on Trek, let me say "nice link".

Matthew Davis - One more bit to add to your comprehensive list, this one a matter of authorial re-use of a good bit: the fate that befalls Beckwith at the end of the screenplay - dying again and again by re-materializing endlessly in the heart of a star - was used by Harlan as the fate of his villain Rike Akisimov in the 1957 story "Blank..." Didn't make it into the finished episode in any fashion, but then again, I think the notion of death by Möbius strip might have gone over a few heads...


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